04102019CW0149SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Andy Manar is calling for a full review of state contracts and funding awarded to Land of Lincoln Goodwill following the nonprofit’s decision to pull paychecks from disabled workers.

The nonprofit recently told dozens of workers with disabilities that they would be laid off due to the state’s increase in the minimum wage even though the one dollar per hour increase doesn’t take effect for five months and it is exempt by the U.S. Department of Labor from paying these employees the minimum wage.

“An organization that eliminates opportunity for the most vulnerable people in the state while simultaneously driving up executive compensation should be ashamed of itself,” said Manar, a Bunker Hill Democrat. “Blaming a minimum wage increase that hasn’t even gone into effect and that does not apply to these workers after receiving an increase in taxpayer funding is unacceptable.”

According to a WCIA report, the executive director of the Land of Lincoln Goodwill is currently making $164,000. Further tax records show that Land of Lincoln Goodwill raised executive compensation for two positions during the height of the budget impasse by $86,155 over 3 years.

Land of Lincoln Goodwill currently receives nearly $400,000 in taxpayer funded contracts and was slated to receive a 3.5 percent funding increase under the state’s new budget.

Manar sent a letter to the Illinois Department of Human Services, the Department of Central Management Services and Governor JB Pritzker this morning asking for a review of all contracts with the nonprofit.

“When I work to craft and vote to support a state budget to increase funding for human services programs to benefit the well-being of the most vulnerable, it is not my intention to line the six figure pockets of executives at non-for-profit entities like Ms. Durbin.  Goodwill’s mission statement explicitly states its intent to enhance people’s dignity by eliminating barriers to opportunity,” Manar said. “There seems to be an abundance of opportunity today for Ms. Durbin but not so much for Goodwill’s now unemployed disabled workers. Unfortunately, local Goodwill executives are on the wrong path and we must now take extra steps to ensure taxpayer dollars are being used properly and for their intended purposes.”

Category: Latest News

03132019CM1376SPRINGFIELD, Illinois – There’s some hope on the horizon for scores of Illinois residents who are the victims of growing drug prices and shrinking numbers of available pharmacies.

State Senator Andy Manar (D-Bunker Hill) today announced that the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services is finally implementing the Critical Access Pharmacy Program, providing $10 million in additional funding to keep rural, independent pharmacies open.

Throughout rural Illinois communities, consumers have experienced skyrocketing drug prices because of the poorly-regulated Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM) industry. PBM operations craft special deals with large corporate chain stores that small, independent and locally-owned operations can’t compete with. As a result, the small businesses are closing their doors and residents are forced to travel long distances to get the medications they need.

“Rural, independent pharmacies have long been at a disadvantage and some people in my district have been left with no options for miles around,” said State Senator Andy Manar, a Bunker Hill Democrat. “If we don’t take action now, we’re going to see costs continue to rise and competition continue to be stamped out.”

The Critical Access Pharmacy Program was included as a part of last year’s state budget, but implementation was stalled by then-governor Bruce Rauner. Today the effort is back online and Manar says he’s hopeful the quick implementation will provide much-needed relief for local pharmacies.

“This funding is going to be a major boost for rural pharmacies and will help keep them open while we find ways to combat the rising cost of prescription drugs,” said Manar, who helped ensure the inclusion of the funding in the budget. “I’m glad to see that we’re finally leaving the gridlock of the past behind and bringing this needed program to communities that are at risk of losing their local pharmacies.”

Manar also passed legislation, House Bill 465, this spring that would create a framework allowing the state to regulate PBMs, which negotiate drug prices and benefits on behalf on insurers to increase profit margins.

PBMs are largely unregulated and have not been subject to oversight, auditing or transparency laws in Illinois, even though they manage public money through the Medicaid program.

By increasing the prices of prescription medication, they often drive out competition, particularly in underserved rural areas.

“These middle men have been able to influence this industry essentially unchecked and it’s consumers who are bearing the brunt of the cost,” Manar said. “These practices are unfair and exploitative and I’m proud to sponsor legislation that will give us the authority to crack down on bad actors.”

House Bill 465 is currently awaiting the governor’s signature.

Category: Latest News

04122019CM0717SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Andy Manar expressed his congratulations today to two Central Illinois educators and 48th District residents on their appointment and swearing in to the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) this spring.

“It was important to me that rural school districts in Downstate Illinois were represented on the State Board of Education and I expressed that sentiment to Governor Pritzker.  I applaud the Governor’s appointment of Susan Morrison and Dr. David Lett who will be strong voices for small schools while balancing the needs of the entire state,” said Manar.

Susan Morrison, of Carlinville, and David Lett, of Rochester, are among seven newly sworn in members who will serve four-year terms on the State Board of Education.

Morrison, who was first appointed to the board in 2017, has worked as an Illinois educator and an advocate for children for nearly 40 years. She began her career in education in the Central Illinois communities of Homer and Girard as a social studies teacher and later worked as a building principal and director of curriculum and instruction.

Morrison also has statewide experience in education, serving as state director for several state and federal programs, including gifted education and school improvement. She retired from ISBE in 2015 as deputy superintendent and chief education officer before returning to serve on the board.

“Susan Morrison’s extensive experience prepared her well for her first two years on the board, during which she demonstrated how capable she is at addressing problems facing public education in Illinois,” said Manar, a Bunker Hill Democrat. “She is more than deserving of another four years in her position, and I’m confident that she will continue to show leadership and effectively advocate on behalf of Illinois’ students and faculty.”

Dr. David Lett, who is serving his first term on the Board, has dedicated over 35 years as a teacher and leader in both K-12 schools and higher education. He began his career as a social science teacher before serving as a principal and assistant principal.

Lett also spent 16 years as superintendent of Pana Community Unit School District 8. He was one of the Central Illinois superintendents who approached Manar in 2012 about the need for a complete re-write of the school funding formula.  Dr. Lett is currently an adjunct professor in the Education Leadership Department at the University of Illinois Springfield.

“With over three decades of experience in education at the local level as both a teacher and an administrator, Dr. Lett understands better than just about anyone the challenges school districts face,” Manar said. “He will be an excellent addition to the board, he will represent Downstate Illinois with a strong voice, and I look forward to working with him to fight for Illinois schools.”

Category: Latest News

04102019CW0188SPRINGFIELD – Sections of two Illinois highways will be renamed for fallen Macoupin County soldiers under legislation sponsored by State Senator Andy Manar and approved by the General Assembly this spring.

Senate Joint Resolution 9 designates Illinois Route 159 between Detour Road and Illinois Route 16 in Bunker Hill as “Lance Cpl. Charles Heinemeier Memorial Highway.”

Heinemeier enlisted in the U.S. Marines in May of 1968 and attended his basic training in California. Six months later, he was sent to Vietnam.

The Bunker Hill native was killed in action on August 19, 1969 while serving with the 1st Marine Division in Quang Nam, Vietnam.

Heinemeier was remembered by his fellow soldiers as having a positive attitude even in the midst of difficult circumstances.

“Your son was our morale booster,” Heinemeier’s commanding office wrote to his mother after his death. “We wouldn’t have made it through without him.”

Heinemeier was posthumously awarded three Bronze Stars and the Purple Heart.

“Cpl. Heinemeier is an example to us all with his positive attitude and his commitment to serving our country,” said Manar, a Bunker Hill Democrat. “It’s only appropriate that we honor him and the sacrifice he made on our behalf.”

Manar also sponsored House Joint Resolution 21, which renames part of Illinois Route 16 in Shipman “Sgt. Glenard Jay Gregory Memorial Road.”

Gregory started his tour of Vietnam in May of 1968 and was injured in combat on April 19, 1969. He passed away from his wounds a day later at the age of 20, just days before he was scheduled to return home.

He was awarded the Vietnam Campaign Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the National Defense Medal, the Purple Hear Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, the Expert Sharpshooter Medal and the Bronze Star.

“Sgt. Gregory was a hero, and his tragic death is a story that was all too familiar during the Vietnam War,” Manar said. “It’s our responsibility to keep his memory alive and remind others of the sacrifice he made in service to his country.”

Gregory is buried in Shipman Cemetery and is honored on Panel 26w, Line 15 of the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

Manar said that constituents including area veterans, relatives, and friends of both Heinemeier and Gregory approached him with the idea of designating the roads.

The resolutions direct the Illinois Department of Transportation to erect signage to appropriately designate both routes as directed by the General Assembly.

Category: Latest News

School Funding Reform

 

eNewsletter Signup

eNewsletter Signup
  1. First Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  2. Last Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  3. Your Email(*)
    Please let us know your email address.

Contact Me

Springfield Office:
119A Capitol Building
Springfield, IL 62706
Phone: (217) 782-0228

Decatur Office:
Macon County Office Building
141 S. Main St., Suite 502
Decatur, IL 62523
Phone: (217) 429-8110

Bunker Hill Office:
115 N. Washington, P.O. Box 636
Bunker Hill, IL 62014
Phone: (618) 585-4848